WebSphere – The backupConfig script your friend


This is just a short post – But the built-in utility you get with the backupConfig script is worth looking into for everybody!

if you have worked with WebSphere for any significant time you have come across the built-in backup and restore utility that each WebSphere server has by default: [backupconfig.bat] or on Unix/Linux [backupconfig.sh] and the corresponding restore scripts [restoreConfig.bat] and [restoreConfig.sh]. 

At my current client we are working on application customizations and testing them on new servers. This is where the backupConfig comes in handy as it does not just back-up your application server(s) but the deployment manager and all the node(s) configuration as well – so you can replay a whole server configuration along with the installed applications and any application specific configuration. backupConfig can also be used to migrate servers from one piece of hardware to another (or VM server or, …. any combination is possible).

The process is simple: find the scripts in the [/bin] folder of either the Dmgr or the node,  execute the script and it will check your servers configuration, stop all server instances including nodeagents and then create a zip file of ALL files necessary for the back-up – and all of this wonderfulness is  unencumbered by the human thought process … 🙂

Whenever I am about to install a new application, install any fixes or make configuration changes to a WebSphere  server I run the backupConfig script once first and keep a copy of the zip file it created on a local machine – just to be safe.

Where to run:

Depending on your architecture you can run it on the Deployment Manager and/or all nodes. When you run it on the Deployment manager it will grab all the configuration for the Dmgr, nodes and application servers in one go. This is essential if you have to restore an environment. On a managed node (separate HW) it will capture the configuration and applications installed on that physical node – so you might need to run it on each physical WebSphere server in your environment once to get a total base back-up. Once I have that I usually just run the scripts on the deployment manager as most of the work happens there anyway and all changes are synchronized out to the nodes.

Restores:

On windows it is simple – just run the restoreConfig script and tell it which zip file to use … and presto. On Unix/Linux you have to think a bit more. The backupConfig script does not keep any file rights or ownership information, when restoring it basically sets the file ownership to the account being used to run the script – so make sure you are using the same account and have read/write rights to the folders involved. 

Here is the link to the documentation in the WebSphere Infocenter – I hope you find it useful and make a back-up of your servers soon!

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